Panya Clark Espinal

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Lost in the Wood, 2014

Multi-media installation in collaboration with Toronto architect Nathanael Gray

Laser-cut and laser-etched Baltic birch plywood, wood stain, felt, 3-D printed ceramic, wool, beeswax; dimensions variable

Lost in the Wood is both a sculpture and functional dining space for intimate gatherings of six people. It is an immersive, participatory environment that acts as a completely unique and extraordinary meeting place, engaging with those occupying the work in a sensual and tactile way. It is a platform for communication, celebration and inspiration.

Lost in the Wood was fabricated in 2014 by Clark Espinal with technical assistance from Nathanael Gray. It is constructed primarily of hand-cut industrial felt, laser-cut birch plywood and 3-D printed food-safe ceramic. All components are carefully designed to integrate into a connected whole that can be read as an image from a singular vantage point. Supporting components such as serving platters and trays are produced from off-cuts of the primary production. Participants are encouraged to wear the felted clogs provided when entering the work.

Lost in the Wood is a living art work that can be programmed in various ways to encourage its occupation. In some instances those occupying the piece have brought pre-prepared foods of their own choosing. In other cases chefs have been given the opportunity to create meals that reflect the intent of a particular group gathering. Past occupations have varied widely in levels of involvement and scope.

It is my wish, my longing, that one day we might sit together, you and I, that we might raise our glasses and look one another in the eye, that we might wet our lips with the nectar of life itself and feed one another the bread that was baked when the wheat herself died. Let us travel our solitary roads to find one another in an unlikely place, at an intersection where we glimpse, for a moment, a curious connection. Allow us to immerse ourselves in the cruelty and the grace of it’s falling apart. Let us compose ourselves in the company of decomposition, bearing witness to the evidence of light, the evidence of shadow. Let us, for a time, hold up and consider what has been, what is, and what will never be again. If we are lost, let us be lost together.